It is a well-known fact that women’s economic empowerment has a direct, positive effect on poverty eradication and economic growth. “Economic access provides financial freedom, emboldening women with a higher level of choice,”
says Yogavelli Nambiar of the Allan Orbis Foundation.

As the CEO at the helm of a foundation that aims to make a sustainable, long-term contribution to southern Africa by nurturing emerging entrepreneurial talent in the region, it’s unsurprising that Nambiar sees entrepreneurship as the greater enabler of such progress.

The word entrepreneurship, Nambiar notes, originates from the French entreprendre, which means “to undertake”.

“The undertaking of an endeavour speaks to having a growth mindset, recognising opportunity, displaying proactivity and taking on risk – and when indulged in, provides a sense of agency.

When women undertake the creation of an enterprise, it provides a sense of power over their futures and an agency that gives them confidence in their abilities.” It is this activity that must be encouraged not only to bring about women innovators on the African continent, but also to drive our economies into the innovation-driven stage. This will enable us to invest in advanced skills and the latest technologies, increasing productivity and leading global innovation.

Read more about how equipping women with entrepreneurial skills can change the lives of women on the African continent in the 15th edition of Top Women Leaders, on shelves in November.

Featured image courtesy of Brooke Lark on Unsplash

Sharing is caring!

shares